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mitchell, and roswell will identify with this. george shultz and secretary of state for approximately a month came to the state department for somebody well versed in economics and business. he wasn't somebody who paid attention to the strategic nuclear balance at that time. i got a call and paul mitchell was coming in to have lunge from the state department and went to the lunch and paul and secretary shultz, on his informal chats with the russian ambassador on their proposed arms control which would have led to lower levels, not the zero option, but would not converge to missile all narrowed out. the big problem, when i listen to this, the secret of our success, very close to the allies. the fact that our ambassador without telling anyone and giving them a sense of ownership is very dangerous. the reason he didn't go off of the road was the russians turned down that deal. they could have stopped it in our tracks. one other quick anecdotes we deployed those missiles about a month after a crisis in which the soviets shot down of korean airline, strong calls from the white house for us
of my dissertation adviser, to do the research for george shultz's memoir and--out at stanford. c-span: why--why to the dismay? >> guest: oh, because it was such a huge project for some--someone who was working on her own dissertation, to take on another project, and--but i thought it was a great opportunity. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: in 1989, i moved out to california to work with condi rice, who was my outside reader on my thesis committee, partly, and also to be in the bay area, and she got a job in the bush at the first bush administration, and so i just happened to meet shultz one day and asked him if i could interview him for my research. and he'd just left the reagan administration, and he was allowing students to interview him. and so he allowed me to interview him, and it led to me working for him to do the research for his memoir. c-span: now how did condi rice become your--what?--outside of what s... >> guest: my reader. c-span: harvard? >> guest: yeah, the--an outside reader on the dissertation, but from another university. c-span: but from ucla. >> guest:
walk in the woods dipole med sin. and ross will identify with this. george shultz had been secretary of states for approximately a month and he came to the state department as someone well versed in economics and business. he wasn't somebody who paid attention to this strategic nuclear balance. he was coming into a lunch at them and what i come to the lunch. i went to lunch and paul then briefed secretary shall on his informal chat with the russian ambassador to convince key on their proposed arms control, which would have fled or were double deployment. would not have been this low steer about. the big problem when i listen to this is the secret of our success in getting the missiles in was very close consultations with the ally. the fact that our ambassador had cut the steel without telling any and giving them a sense of ownership is very dangerous. the reason we didn't go off the road was the russians turn down that deal. they could start deployment in our charts. finally, just one other quick anecdote. we deploy those missiles in the fall of 1983 about a month after our crisis wi
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will identify this. george shultz as secretary of state -- had been suggested for approximately a month. he came from the state department, ma someone who was well versed in economics in business. he wasn't somebody that paid attention to strategic nuclear balance. and he, i got a call. paul was coming and have lunch, when i come to lunch on the seventh floor. and i went to the lunch, and paul then briefed secretary schultz on his informal chat with a russian ambassador on their proposed arms control. which would have led to lower levels of deployment. not a zero option to lower levels of deployment. but would not have involved persian to missile battle. that was absolutely zeroed out. the big problem, when i listen to this is the secret of our success, getting the missiles in. the fact that our ambassador had gone off -- without telling any of them, and giving them a sense of ownership, it was very dangerous to the reason he didn't go off the road was the russians stupidly turned down that deal. they could have stopped deployment in our tracks. finally, just one other quick anecdote. we deploy
question to answer. >> to of the people you dedicate this to our job shultz and the elite william f. buckley. i'm proud to be, and in fact you can go on to say this is endorsed by milton friedman has a hero of mine, and also of course walter cronkite who is a hero in a lot of other ways and george shultz, like to say, the former secretary of state for ronald reagan, no-man's liberal but you get those folks together to agree on anything and it's pretty impressive. >> you also have another book out and this is another new one? what is this one? >> it is a handbook of solutions to america's problems and there really are resolutions to these problems. and honestly i wrote this without having any intentions or thoughts of being involved in another political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for
treasury's office intelligence, george shultz is regularly on our mind in part because one of the tables used all the treasury now sits in the office of one of my colleagues, steny glaser. secretary shultz served -- danny glazer. secretary shultz served, patriotic, dedicated to what is right for country. there's only a handful of men in american history to serve as both secretary of state and secretary of treasury. only three before him and 1¢. george shultz and understood as few others can -- since. george shultz and understood -- even if he could not have predicted the place of the treasury department occupies in america's national security architecture. god they will work to advance our national security interests -- today we work to a dance our national security interests by systematically undermine the financial strength of those who threaten our national security. while my colleagues in the treasury department are hard at work preparing our economy, laying the foundation for sustained and balanced growth and job creation here at home and working to create an mitigate financial ins
and aei the correspondence. >> can we move on to the gentleman right there in the back, nick shultz? >> nick shultz here at aei. thank you for stimulating the presentation. i have two questions for you if you wouldn't mind. the first is if you could talk about -- we are talking about to some extent the politicization to science, most of what happens in search of public policy discussions. i wonder what your thoughts are on the politicization of science and academia, and if there has been, say, a slight -- i don't want to for lack of a better word say corruption -- of some scientific disciplines because of the interactions with the sights and mike climate science but there could be other examples. >> i actually just wrote -- i would find it hard to believe that it's in the gm know because the biological and the chemical and the physical science are about as far removed from the political ideology as you can possibly imagine. mauney daily routine at the lab is to grow bacteria and then do very bizarre things to them and then get results from that. my political philosophy played no rol
." i'm ed shultz. good evening, i'm rachel maddow. >> thank you for staying with us. we're going to have the latest on the aftermath and the continuing news out of newtown connecticut tonight as well as some other important politics, news that is not related to what happened in newtown. the brand new senator elect is chris murphy. the mayor of newark, new jersey is going to be joining us in just a moment. as is the police chief from oak creek wisconsin where that mass shooting occurred this past august. that is all coming up this hour. but, in order to understand one important element of the response to newtown, in order to try to get a handle on the range of possible outcomes here, as we try to make decisions as a country as to whether we are going to change as a country because of this massacre and because of the national heartbreak it has caused, to try to get at that very big question, there is a very narrow discussion to be had about a piece of new technology. this is something called a 3d printer. anybody can become a small-scale manufacturer of anything. all you have to do
on cups to push members of congress to come to a deal on the fiscal cliff. shultz followed up with a blog saying everyone should put the pressure on congress. >>> a cartoonist went a more pessimistic approach. a box labeled deficit crisis compromised saying do not open until with all the holidays crossed out signed by boehner and obama. >>> all featured on politico's list of the top viral videos of 2012. the politico ones, of course. here's a look back. >> in the silvery moonlight that bathes every town, the people lie dreaming so safe and so sound. they're warm in their beds, snuggled up in the sheets. but four years before, they were out in the streets. sorry, my friend, but there's no time to snore. we're all on our own if romney has his way. and he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. so i strongly suggest that you wake the [ bleep ] up. >> there's only one thing that might deny us the presidency that is the god-given property and he's against safety nets. if you fall, tough luck. so i strongly suggest that you wake the [ bleep ] up. >> there's only one thing that might den
." i'm ed shultz.
. and that is "the ed show." i'm ed shultz. good evening, i'm rachel maddow. >> thank you for staying with us. we're going to have the latest on the aftermath and the continuing news out of newtown connecticut tonight as well as some other important politics, news that is not related to what happened in newtown. the brand new senator elect is chris murphy. the mayor of newark, new jersey is going to be joining us in just a moment. as is the police chief from oak creek wisconsin where that mass shooting occurred this past august. that is all coming up this hour. but, in order to understand one important element of the response to newtown, in order to try to get a handle on the range of possible outcomes here, as we try to make decisions as a country as to whether we are going to change as a country because of this massacre and because of the national heartbreak it has caused, to try to get at that very big question, there is a very narrow discussion to be had about a piece of new technology. this is something called a 3d printer. anybody can become a small-scale manufacturer of anything. all you h
know well. the stock has been something to watch. it certainly has been very volatile. richard shultz founded this company back in 1956. according to the minneapolis star tribune, he is working on some offer by the end of the week. fourteen dollars. the ten year chart showed it was a $60 stock. there it is today at 14.10. cheryl: republicans and democrats are holding dueling news conferences on republican hill today. house speaker john boehner blaming the white house for the stalemate. >> i have been pushing all year for us to address this problem. here we are in the president still is not serious about dealing with this issue right here. it is this issue. spending. cheryl: on the other side of capitol hill, harry reid, says it is not president obama's fault, it is john boehner's. >> speaker boehner cannot avoid the american people forever. at some point, reality should set in. cheryl: and so it goes. the fiscal cliff growing ever closer and no deal inside. both saying congress is christmas break may be canceled. dennis: bah humbug. fiscal cliff fears have said demand for coins soarin
years. secretary shultz, thank you for coming and please, in a written testimony that you have will become a part of the record and i would like to take five minutes or whatever you can use for your thoughts on this issue. >> thank you mr. sherman. my name is matt schultz the secretary of state of iowa and i appreciate the opportunity to testify before the committee today and i want to thank senator grassley for extending the invitation before the committee. i was elected in 2010 fighting for election integrity was a cornerstone of my campaign to the it seems clear a lack of confidence in the integrity of elections is one of the reasons people do not vote. some believe their votes do not matter and that is the true cause of the voter suppression across this country. we have seen that measure adopted and protect the integrity of elections such as voter identification law has led to an increase in voter participation. opponents of the measures frequently claim those meant to enhance the integrity are suppressing the growth yet they offer no evidence to support their claims only t
of congress, president obama asked that wasserman shultz to stay on as the chairwoman of the democratic national committee. next, what is happening in the senate. facing gop opposition. a u.n. treaty advocating equal rights for disability facing significant opposition. host: tune in to c-span2 3 coverage of the senate. next caller. but the make of this latest back-and-forth? the gop sending of their proposal to the white house yesterday. this caller: is danny from college park, ga.. host: go ahead. caller: greta, i have never seen a group of people who are so willing to be lied to. republicans like to their people all through the election. the only people who were surprised that the president won are people who watch fox news. just like that, a proposal that john boehner puts out. he's trying to say that it is from the bowles proposal but erskine bowles came out yesterday and said flat out that the proposal the republicans put out does not mimic his. therefore, the republicans are lying again. republicans and the tea party people, they know that they are lying. it is just that simple. t
versus shultz case, and he wrote these words -- "the fact that one has disclosed private papers to a bank for a limited purpose within the context of a confidential customer-bank relationship does not mean that you have waived all right to the privacy of your papers. but privacy and the fourth amendment have steadily lost ground over the past century. from the california bankers association case to smith versus maryland to u.s. versus miller. the majority has ruled that your records, once they are held by a third party, don't deserve the same fourth amendment protections. ironically, though, digital records seem to get less protection than paper records. as the national association of defense attorneys has pointed out, since the 1870's, the government must get a warrant to look and read your mail, as is the case of katz versus the united states, the government has been required to have a warrant to tap your phone. however, under current law, your email, your text messages and other electronic communications do not receive the same level of protection as your phone calls do. why is a phone
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)